Understanding Bladder Prolapse (Cystocele)

by Jyll Renee, Master Herbologist

Are you a woman experiencing discomfort in the vaginal area, problems with urination and/or painful intercourse? Then perhaps your bladder has shifted out of its normal position. Read on to learn more about bladder prolapse and what treatments are available.

What is bladder prolapse?
Under normal conditions in women, the bladder is held in position by a “hammock” of supportive pelvic floor muscles and ligaments. When these muscles and tissues are stretched and/or weakened, the back of the bladder can sag through this layer of muscles and ligaments and into the vagina, resulting in bladder prolapse, also referred to as a cystocele. In severe cases, the sagging bladder will appear at the vagina’s opening and can even protrude (drop) through it. Bladder prolapse is rarely a life-threatening condition and can usually be corrected.

What causes bladder prolapse?
Prolapse can develop for a variety of reasons, but the most significant factor is stress on this supportive “hammock” during childbirth. Women who have multiple pregnancies or deliver vaginally are at higher risk. Other factors that can lead to prolapse include: heavy lifting, chronic coughing, constipation, frequently straining to pass stool, obesity, menopause (when estrogen levels start to drop) and previous pelvic surgery. In rare cases, it can be present at birth (congenital).

What are the symptoms for bladder prolapse?
Symptoms associated with prolapse include: frequent urination or urge to urinate; stress incontinence; not feeling bladder relief immediately after urinating; frequent urinary tract infections; discomfort or pain in the vagina, pelvis, lower abdomen, groin or lower back; heaviness or pressure in the vaginal area; painful intercourse; or tissue protruding from the vagina that may be tender and/or bleeding. Mild cases of prolapse may not cause any symptoms.

How is bladder prolapse detected?
Prolapse can usually be detected with a pelvic examination. However, a voiding cystourethrogram may be required. This test involves a series of X-ray pictures that are taken during urination which will show the shape of the bladder and will help identify obstructions blocking the normal flow of urine. Other X-rays and tests may also be required to find or rule out problems in other parts of the urinary system, including urodynamics, cystoscopy and fluoroscopy.

What are the treatment options for bladder prolapse?
For mild prolapse cases, behavior therapies such as Kegel exercises (which help strengthen pelvic floor muscles) may be enough.  Detox-cleansing the urinary, drinking Nettle Tea is like a kegel exercise in a cup; the tannins strengthen the tissue.

If prolapse is left untreated, over time the condition may get worse. In rare cases, severe prolapse can cause urinary retention (inability to urinate) which may lead to kidney damage or infection.

Jyll Renee Master Herbologist
765.644.0312
[email protected]

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Home Office
45 Cambridge court
Anderson, Indiana 46012

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6252 W. Kilgore Ave
Muncie, IN 47304

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1110 S. Peru Street
Cicero, Indiana 46034

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www.luminearth.com

Disclaimer: The statements in this article are for educational purposes only and have not been evaluated by or sanctioned by the FDA. Only your doctor can properly diagnose and treat any disease or disorder. The remedies discussed herein are not meant to treat or cure any type of disease. The user understands that the above information is NOT intended as a substitute for the advice of a physician or a pharmacist.

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Becki Baumgartner

Herbalist, Certified Tennessee Naturalist, Certified Reiki Master at LuminEarth.com
Becki Baumgartner is a certified member of the American Holistic Medical Association. Becki graduated from Clayton College in 2011 with a BS in Natural Health, Minor in Herbology, obtained her Usui Shiki Ryoho Reiki Master Certification in 2012, and her Tennessee Naturalist Certification in 2013. She is currently enrolled in the Master Herbalist Program at the Academy of Natural Health Sciences. She has been a Lead Investigator for Volunteer State Paranormal Research since 2010 and in 2012 joined Natchez Trace Veterinary Services, an Alternative Medicine Veterinary Clinic, as Practice Manager and Herbalist. She is also a volunteer naturalist for Metro Parks, facilitates a weekly Reiki Share at Center of Symmetry in Nashville, and facilitates Reiki, Herbology and Alternative Health classes and workshops in the Nashville Area. Chat with Becki on Google+ | LinkedIn | Facebook
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